Friday, December 28, 2012

Save a Life: Spay & Neuter

During my recent trip to the vet with Cooper, I saw several other dogs and pet parents in the waiting room.  It saddened me to see dogs that were not spayed or neutered. 

I try not to judge owners with a female that has obviously been bred.  Several people adopt females that have been saved from puppy mills or that have been turned into shelters after years of backyard breeding.  I understand that these people are responsible adopters that do not condone breeding.  The fact still remains, however, that either the current or previous owner was not responsible.

There are so many reasons to spay or neuter your pet.  The most wonderful reason:  You will help put an end to overpopulation!  Here are a couple of heartbreaking statistics from "The Adopted Dog Bible":
  • There are about 34,000 puppies born in the United States every day!
  • There are millions of dogs put to sleep each year in our shelters.
Let's do a little math.  34,000 x 365 = 12,410,000.  Over 12 million puppies are born each year in the United States.  Imagine if this number was controlled through spaying and neutering.  There would be so many fewer deaths due to overpopulation.

Here is another wonderful (& beneficial!) reason to spay and neuter.  There are several health benefits.  Research shows that altered dogs live longer and healthier lives than dogs that are not spayed or neutered.  Spayed females are much less likely to get mammary cancer.  Testicular cancer can also be prevented by neutering.

There are also behavioral benefits to altering your dog.  Males are less likely to roam in search of a mate. (And less likely to get lost!)  Altered males can also be less aggressive.

Spaying and neutering is a marvelous thing!  Here is a link to find low-cost spay and neuter programs in your area from the ASPCA website.

As always, please consider adopting your next best friend from your local shelter or rescue group.  You will be saving a life as well as enriching your own!

Thanks for stopping by!

-Laura



Reference

"The Adopted Dog Bible" By Kim Saunders
Published in 2008


19 comments:

  1. Good points, good data, and VERY good advice!

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  2. You make a good point about a female dog being bred before she gets into her loving foster or forever home. I always try to tell people that the person holding the leash may not be the irresponsible one but the one that saved her.

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  3. Hey Cooper, Hey June, Hey Buddy, Jet here. Hi Miss Laura.

    Whoo hoo and high paws for reminding everyone about these terrible statistics, Miss Laura! May we add (from personal experience with Little Miss Pyometra)our scary experience this past May because JJ wasn't spayed. http://heyitsjethere.wordpress.com/2012/05/12/linda-and-the-brown-dawgs-saved-jjs-life/

    A few years back 94,000 + K9s/felines were passing through Miami Dade Animal Services... :( (I almost didn't make it out.) Imagine if people spayed and neutered...

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jet!

      94,000 certainly is one big, scary number! I am so glad you made it out, Jet! You are one lucky pup to have such a great family.

      I just read your post about JJ. So very scary! I am glad all is okay now! Just one more reason to advocate fixing your pet.

      Thanks for sharing!

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  4. A very good post, I too wish more people were responsible. You didn't mention that another good reason to reason to rescue a pet is that most often, they are already spayed or neutered or if too young, the cost is often reimbursed.

    Our latest rescue addition Breeze and her brother Chance - he was adopted after we brought him home, were spayed and neutered at age 12 weeks (yikes!)since the (kill) shelter wouldn't allow any adoptions without.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for bringing that up! That is a very good point. The shelter I adopted June at didn't have her spayed, but they set us up a very low cost (like $60) appointment to get it done. Or they would have given us a credit if we went somewhere else.

      Either way you slice it, rescuing is a great thing!!

      And yes... Twelve weeks is quite early but at least they were able to go to a great home!! :)

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  5. Excellent post with lots of good info! Thanks for sharing and for stopping by!
    xoxo Chloe and LadyBug

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    Replies
    1. You are most welcome, Jeanne! I am glad you liked it:)

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  6. Hi just hopped over from the Pet Blogger hop and started following...

    What a great post this is, I totally agree with the spaying of dogs and bitches from rescue and for a variety of health reasons.

    But please don't condemn those of us that have an unneutered Dog, sometimes there is a reason, I have always neutered in the past but my current dog is not. He has serious problems when it comes to anesthetics, therefore it has been decided that to neuter him was an unnecessary anesthetic risk to his life.

    He doesn't roam, he is not aggressive and has never been bred from and at 11 years old he is a very fit and healthy dog.



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    Replies
    1. I certainly do not condemn you for that, Dawn! That is most definitely an extenuating circumstance. I wouldn't risk my pup with surgery if he was allergic to anesthetics either. I know there are gray areas in life.

      I am glad you are a reponsible pet owner! Thanks for stopping by! Have a great weekend:)

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  7. Oh my goodness! Awesome article dude! Many
    thanks, However I am experiencing problems with your RSS.
    I don't know why I cannot join it. Is there anyone else getting similar RSS issues? Anybody who knows the solution will you kindly respond? Thanx!!
    My homepage : instant gagnant

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you!

      I haven't had any issues before with the RSS feed. I follow my own page and have no issues. You may try the follow by e-mail. I follow with two different e-mails, and it works just fine.

      Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  8. Many great points I think bandit would be very different if he was fixed, Charlie too.

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    1. Thank you, Angela! Neutering for sure changes them a bit, but it's for the good:) Glad you liked it!

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  9. Many great points I think bandit would be very different if he was fixed, Charlie too.

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  10. Sorry I wrote that wrong they are fixed and its a good thing

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    Replies
    1. I thought they were!!! Glad the follow up comments are working after all :)

      Delete

Thanks for your comments!
-Laura

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